alberteinsteinofficial:

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury

and guess what in space they pick categories when they have a lot of things to name like the craters on mercury. the category for naming them is after deceased artists

alberteinsteinofficial:

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury

and guess what in space they pick categories when they have a lot of things to name like the craters on mercury. the category for naming them is after deceased artists

lumos5001:

this is why snails were created

lumos5001:

this is why snails were created

foucault-the-haters:

be the spectre of communism you want to see in the world

artschoolglasses:

Favourite Fashion: Alice + Olivia, Fall 2014 RTW

tango-mango:

Baking peanut butter cookies with Spinosaurus

The other day Spinosaurus dropped by for a visit. It was a great surprise to see him because he’s usually so busy, he doesn’t have time to hang out here the way he used to. I was just about to make some peanut butter cookies and he asked if he could help. As you can see, he was a great assistant! Hopefully he will come by more often and help with other projects in the kitchen and garden.

These peanut butter cookies are slightly chewy and coated in a thin layer of sugar, perfect for dunking in a glass of milk or your morning espresso. I’ve been baking them forever, but yesterday I realized it is more fun to make them with a friend. A recipe from Better Homes and Gardens.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

Directions:

Beat peanut butter and butter with electric mixer on medium to high speed for 30 seconds. Add granulated sugar and brown sugar, baking soda, and salt. Beat until combined, scraping sides of bowl occasionally. Beat in egg and vanilla until combined. Beat in as much of the flour as you can with the mixer. Stir in any remaining flour. Cover and refrigerate dough about 1 hour or until easy to handle.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Shape dough in 1-inch balls. Place balls 2 inches apart on an ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten the cookies by making crisscross marks with fork tines or dinosaur footprint, dipping utensil in sugar between flattening each cookie. Bake about 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Transfer to wire racks. Cool. Makes about 3 dozen cookies.

Share with friends.

toothpast:

theworldisanapple-youareaseed:

lizzingwithkriz:

Pregnant Ghost Bat having an ultrasound at Featherdale Wildlife Park

congrats it’s a bat

[delighted bat noises]

toothpast:

theworldisanapple-youareaseed:

lizzingwithkriz:

Pregnant Ghost Bat having an ultrasound at Featherdale Wildlife Park

congrats it’s a bat

[delighted bat noises]

spoliamag:

“Bees are the smallest of birds. They are born from the bodies of oxen, or from the decaying flesh of slaughtered calves; worms form in the flesh and then turn into bees. Bees live in community, choose the most noble among them as king, have wars, and make honey. Their laws are based on custom, but the king does not enforce the law; rather the lawbreakers punish themselves by stinging themselves to death. Bees are afraid of smoke and are excited by noise. Each has its own duty: guarding the food supply, watching for rain, collecting dew to make honey, and making wax from flowers.”
From a medieval bestiary.

spoliamag:

Bees are the smallest of birds. They are born from the bodies of oxen, or from the decaying flesh of slaughtered calves; worms form in the flesh and then turn into bees. Bees live in community, choose the most noble among them as king, have wars, and make honey. Their laws are based on custom, but the king does not enforce the law; rather the lawbreakers punish themselves by stinging themselves to death. Bees are afraid of smoke and are excited by noise. Each has its own duty: guarding the food supply, watching for rain, collecting dew to make honey, and making wax from flowers.”

From a medieval bestiary.

"

“The world is so big, so complicated, so replete with marvels and surprises that it takes years for most people to begin to notice that it is, also, irretrievably broken. We call this period of research “childhood.”

There follows a program of renewed inquiry, often involuntary, into the nature and effects of mortality, entropy, heartbreak, violence, failure, cowardice, duplicity, cruelty, and grief; the researcher learns their histories, and their bitter lessons, by heart. Along the way, he or she discovers that the world has been broken for as long as anyone can remember, and struggles to reconcile this fact with the ache of cosmic nostalgia that arises, from time to time, in the researcher’s heart: an intimation of vanished glory, of lost wholeness, a memory of the world unbroken. We call the moment at which this ache first arises “adolescence.” The feeling haunts people all their lives.

Everyone, sooner or later, gets a thorough schooling in brokenness.”

"

― Michael Chabon, The Wes Anderson Collection (via theclassicals)